Gandhi in His Time and Ours

Mahatma Gandhi created a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting social divisions within India and elsewhere.

Mahatma Gandhi created a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting social divisions within India and elsewhere. What vision produced this new form of politics? Hardiman shows that it was based on Gandhi's larger conception of an alternative society, a human collective that emphasises mutual respect, resistance to exploitation, non-violence and ecological harmony. In its practice, this personal vision sought to include Gandhi's opponents. From representatives of the British Raj to Indian advocates of violent resistance, from right-wing religious leaders to upholders of caste privilege, Gandhi confronted entrenched groups and their more entrenched ideologies with a deceptively simple ethic of resistance. Hardiman examines Gandhi's ways of conducting his conflicts with all these groups, as well as with his critics on the left and representatives of India's underclass, the Dalits. He also explores another key issue in Gandhi's life and legacy with crucial resonance for our own time: his ideas about and attitudes toward women. Despite the failures in his personal life, Gandhi has become a beacon of peace and strength for posterity.

Review:

It certainly ranks among the most useful books on Gandhi published in the last decade.--David M. Fahey Canadian Journal of History (01/01/0001)
Author:
David Hardiman
Format:
Paperback

Description

Mahatma Gandhi created a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting social divisions within India and elsewhere.

Mahatma Gandhi created a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting social divisions within India and elsewhere. What vision produced this new form of politics? Hardiman shows that it was based on Gandhi's larger conception of an alternative society, a human collective that emphasises mutual respect, resistance to exploitation, non-violence and ecological harmony. In its practice, this personal vision sought to include Gandhi's opponents. From representatives of the British Raj to Indian advocates of violent resistance, from right-wing religious leaders to upholders of caste privilege, Gandhi confronted entrenched groups and their more entrenched ideologies with a deceptively simple ethic of resistance. Hardiman examines Gandhi's ways of conducting his conflicts with all these groups, as well as with his critics on the left and representatives of India's underclass, the Dalits. He also explores another key issue in Gandhi's life and legacy with crucial resonance for our own time: his ideas about and attitudes toward women. Despite the failures in his personal life, Gandhi has become a beacon of peace and strength for posterity.

Review:

It certainly ranks among the most useful books on Gandhi published in the last decade.--David M. Fahey Canadian Journal of History (01/01/0001)

Product details

Author:
David Hardiman
Subtitle:
The Global Legacy of His Ideas
Publisher:
University of KwaZulu-Natal Press
ISBN:
9781869140342
Audience:
General
Pages:
368
Width (mm):
138
Length (mm):
225
Additional Info:
David Hardiman, who lived for many years in Gandhi's home region ofGujerat, is based at the University of Warwick. He is a founding member of the Subaltern Studies group. His books include Peasant Nationalists of Gujarat, 1917-1934, The Coming of the Devi: Adivasi Assertion in Western India, and Feeding the Baniya: Peasants and Usurers in Western India.
Weight (g):
445

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